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an afternoon on a sunny day and ride these large sight-seeing boats, that are open air and allow you to see the entire city by sea. for the arts, this museum which houses spectacular murals by monet. for shopping, head to the madison avenue of paris. then grab your walking shoes and head to the champs-elysees. it's a great way to work off a meal. speaking of food, don't forget to buy a real baguette sandwich or a crepe on the street. soon, you'll feel like a native. cnn, paris. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. gives you a low $18.50 monthly plan premium... and select generic hypertension drugs available for only a penny... so you can focus on what really matters. call humana at 1-800-808-4003. >>> we want to continue our conversation we started before the break with lawrence krauss, a theoretical physicist.
the previous year. the city has seen a -- decrease in other violent crimes such as attempted murder and assault. one detective says the drop is largely due to richmond's increased police force from 40 officers to 190 sworn officers in reason years. >>> a little girl and -- and her grandparents are killed in an apartment fire. a devastated mother tells abc7 news how desperately she >>> lawmakers in washington sign off and legislation that hits your breakfast table. [ male announcer ] pillsbury grands biscuits. delicious. but say i press a few out flat... add some beef sloppy joe sauce... and cheese fold it all up and boom! i just made an unbeatable unsloppy joe pillsbury grands biscuits. let the making begin. that's been wrapped in a flaky crust stuffed with a gooey center toasted up all golden brown then given a delicious design? a toaster strudel. pillsbury toaster strudel. so delicious...so fun. >>> good monday morning. december 30 -- december 31st. >> it is 5:00 the time is sneaking up ont;y-s, i'm kristen sze. >>> and i'm katie marzullo in for eric thomas. mike is in the weather center with
, new government warnings, how governments may be collecting large amounts of data on your kids. you're watching "first look" on m s msnbc. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. >>> some stories making news this morning. "the new york times" reports that
is in the community development block grant. that is a block grant that cities use largely. it is very flexible. they can use it to help in their recovery efforts in the most flexible way possible host: new mexico has two air force bases, two national research allowance, and many folks are dependent on federal money for work and assistance programs. for her. -- it will hurt. , democratic caller. caller: explain the logic behind what taxing one of our biggest corporations, which is the religious work -- religious churches and all of that that make $10 trillion a year. and also, how come medicare pays for -- i think it is $1 billion now -- a formula enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. -- for male enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. host: independent caller, go ahead. caller: i would like to bring up the point that you have brought of the federal portion of the moneys and the money does not go -- come out of nowhere. that is the tax dollars, or has been borrowed, were printed. that money is not without cost. i would like to have your opinion on that. thet: you're refe
, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is salt lake what you wanted. >> exactly -- this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. we want to take advantage of the faster speeds that google fire will bring and develop. the sky's the limit. >> reporter: how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> reporter: the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment for top talent to come and stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding that entrepreneur, willing to take a risk in your community is going to grow jobs and ultimately the economy. >> reporter: for now, dreams are growing wild out on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas.
quiet they were largely unskilled and there were no opportunities in the south and went into another plantation. there were no villages and towns and cities in the north. in the north people could free slaves with opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work or for field hands and when the cotton gin was invented, and that absorbed all the slaves unskilled laborer and you now have i plantation owner, this rather cruel lower middle income people buying property in planting cotton prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves competed with them for jobs. but unlike most politicians come he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. >> he was the first to stand up and he led the fight turned his congressional career, which really began after his presidency. he failed to be really did to the presidency. you brought this up before because he didn't have the common touch. he believed it was the need for dignity of a presidential candidate t
. >>> the three cities with the lowest unemployment are all in north dakota. fargo was best with 2.8. grand forks at 3.1%. the key -- large state universities which tend to provide relatively stable jobs. >>> james bond edged out the easter bunny and other this is weekend. dwt skyfall" went back to the top of the list. "the rise of the guard yans" was right behind. and "the twilight saga, breaks dawn part 2" was third. >> sadly, i have seen all of them. >> i've seen none. >>> when we come back, the australian deejays saying sorry for the royal prank that went so terribly wrong. >>> late dram pla from the nfl. lots of teams in the playoff sunt. >>> 700 runners braved the cold in boston for the annual santa speedo run. making a mad dash for charity in skimpy trunks and bikinis. tampa held a similar run. it was near 80 degrees. >>> now for a look at the morning road conditions. slick roads across northern new england, snow-covered passes in the northern rockies. >>> if you're flying, airport delays possible in minneapolis, along the northeast corridor, charlotte, atlanta and new orleans. >> dallas c
to hold on to customers. >> here in the u.s., we've seen circuit city, the electronics store, borders, the bookstore, go out of business. largely because of competition with amazon. >> reporter: based in seattle, amazon was started in the mid-'90s to sell books online. and for years made no profit. but it soon became clear that founder jeff bezos and his notoriously secretive company had bigger plans. they started expanding in the late 1990s into videos, music, games, electronics, kitchenware, clothing, shoes, jewelry, business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002, and today, amazon is a $100 billion global company. and though bezos declined our request for an interview, he recently told "fortune" magazine's andy serwer -- >> our goal is to be the most customer obsessed company. is there someone doing some element better than we? if so, how do we improve? >> online shopping is still only 10% of total retail. >> reporter: meaning amazon in all likelihood is just getting started. ben stein told me recently he has never seen a company dominate
, but the landscape is there now tells you that there was a creek they are. in other words, wherever there is a large sheet of land formerly in the city you'll find public or utilities, things considered at some point of lesser value. likewise since the creek on his story over at once was public housing, industrial warehouses, places where there's a ton of repair shops for taxicabs. the signs are written in numerous languages and also where people -- immigrants are storing their food carts. so it's a place -- that in itself, whereas the creek this practice wars come where things are constantly changing. new plants coming in constantly to nourish that saltmarsh gives us in the estuary. that is mimicked by the human settlement. so it still is a creek. i want to collect estuary i.t. of human development. there's this idea -- of course the city looks at these areas typically, especially in the last 10 years or so that this is an area that is not being used to its full potential. actually this is as if they were -- we were talking about college, but are trained creek is driving in the recently settled her
.m. at city hall, we will be celebrating with all of our schools and school communities, teachers, parents, principals, the fact that sfusd is one of only two large urban school systems in the state of california to have surpassed the 800 api mark. [ applause ] so we're tremendously proud of our students and teachers and communities and principals. so we're going to get together and celebrate. and we're going to celebrate that, but we're also going to recognize schools that are on the move, schools that are closing the achievement gap for african-american and latino students and those with growth. so there will be lots of celebrating going on and we're going to recommitment to closing the achievement gap. because, as much as we're going to celebrate, we're also going to be very clear about the fact that we have a long way to go, but that we have the right people on the bus and the bus is heading in the right direction and we're going to add some gas to the bus on thursday. so we want to invite everybody to come and join us. >> can i just one thing? i just want to recognize the district
largely unskilled and there were no opportunities in the south. the word out of one plantation began to another plantation. there were villages and towns and cities in the north come in and in the north people could read the slaves. there were opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and serve as apprentices and learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work was field hands, and then when it caught him chain was invented -- cotton shane was invented, you now have a sort of patrician of plantation owners. middle and lower-income people buying property and planting cotton. prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves compete for jobs. >> unlike most politicians he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. he was the first to stand up for emancipation and he led the fight throughout his congressional career which began after his presidency. he failed to be reelected and the presidency because he didn't have the common touch. he believed that there was beneath the d
be the large of the tax hike since world war ii. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton remains in a new york city hospital this morning after doctors discovered a blood clot stemming from a concussion she had earlier this month. now, a spokesperson for clinton says she is being treated with medication and will most likely stay in the hospital for the next 48 hours. the clot was discovered yesterday during a follow-up appointment. >>> same-sex couples in maryland will be able to marry tomorrow on new year's day. state lawyers said because january 1st is a holiday and because there is a two-day wait period for licenses to take effect, they could not marry until january 4th. the state's attorney general now says all of the licenses will take effect tomorrow. >>> 2012 was another tough year for the economy. >> so it is no surprise that lottery sales were up. fox's claudia cowan has a look for us. >> are you going to walk away with it? let's find out u. >> reporter: even when times are tough, lotteries rake in the dough. >> during bad times, people want to have hope and dreams and they are appare
. groups trading at 7.7 times earnings, historically trade at ten times, winding down of citi's holdings a benefit to the stock. it's the cheapest in the large cap universe on price to book basis absent bank of america, trading 8% of price to book. i think this is what you want to go into, things with definable catalysts, and when you have a stock rally, the financials participate in the history of markets. it's one you want to hold on. energy side, clearly, energy is not growing in terms of the demand in the u.s.. where it's growing is the rest of the world. >> right. >> we don't have any real opec or non-opec growth in terms of plux. who gets the call? the people who do offshore and deepwater drilling and down hole work. that's why you want to be there. >> global diversions here to some extent. all right, thank you very much, gentlemen, john stevenson and larry, have a great weekend. >> thank you, you too. >> thanks. >> leaders meeting with the president right now this very moment at the white house and the country and entire world watching because if we go off the cliff, markets aroun
in an effort to restore balance. we are expecting large protests here today outside the palace here in cairo. in the city of alexandria, there have been more violent clashes between president morsei's opponents and his supporters. the president's opponents are demanding that he immediately gives up all of the sweeping new powers that he gave himself two weeks ago. they also want him to postpone a referendum on egypt's new constitution, due to take place in just over a week. critics say that constitution doesn't protect the rights of all egyptians. but president morsi didn't do either of those things last night. instead he offered to give up just one of his new powers, vaguely worded right to take all necessary measures to affect the country. he said he would give up the other powers once the referendum had taken place. also yesterday, president obama telephoned president morsi to express his deep concern over the violence and deaths that have occurred. he also urged president morsi to have a dialogue with the opposition without any preconditions. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo
that came to be this political machine. but by and large it was run by these two guys. an irish man and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the city in the subtitle, fearless ethnics and political wizards, scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. but it's a different time now. i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is about five or six pounds all together. it is troy, schenectady, its saratoga. saratoga is only half an hour away. these are great places to live. and to see. there's a lot to see. account is coming back. it's also a great, beautiful town. a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore people thought it had. >> on a recent visit to albany, new york, with the help of our partner time warner cable, booktv explored the literary and cultural atmosphere of the city. albany known as one of the most populous cities in the u.s. in 1810 is home to several institutions of higher living -- learning including the university of albany, stage and president of new york, a albany law school which is the fourth oldest law sch
began demanding new gun control measures. the city of chicago has seen unprecedented violence this year and the mainstream media has largely been silent. nearly 2400 people were shot this year. that's up 12%. more than 480 people were murdered. that's a 19% increase. and there was no peace during the christmas holiday. one man was killed and 13 other people were injured by gunfire. but, one of the deadliest weekends came over saint patrick's day weekend when 49 people were shot, 10 of them fatally. deadly weekend. >> what's driving this violence, father? >> well, i think there is a number of things. first of all, i think chicago is the poster boy right now. epidemic across the country largely ignoring because the victims are primarily black and brown. but i think you have high unemployment. you have poor education you have communities broken apart and creates perfect storm and culture in this country almost the norm and we have become immune to it we can't get immune to children dying in ourl: all right. in cities like new york and some other towns across the country, the murder rate is
itself up in cities and on the coasts. it brought me back to square one and keeping my curiosity on the systems and not just the internet, but power and aviation and the large complicated things that we depend on so much. >> "tubes" is the name of the book. andrew blum is the author. this is "communicators" on c- span. >> sometimes he was a cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. many of his age and class, they're not going to apologize to a young and private secretary. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of an apology would be to say, well, i am a kind man and you are doing a good job today. but the issue was never settled. he always had to get the
, large like new york city, was pounded and pounded and pounded by this devastating hurricane. all america watched, we all held our breath, we all feared the worst, and we saw the worst. and, at the same time, we saw the indomitable spirit of the american people hanging onto their home, praying for their livelihood, and while all that was going on and the president visited, the governors on both sides of the aisle, to say you've got the united states of america behind you. well, the united states of america being behind you, whether you're governor o'malley or governor christie or governor cuomo or the other goafns means that we -- governors means that we need to pass this bill, and we want to pass it because we know that lives were devastated and livelihoods were ruined. in maryland, gosh, we faced these unique challenges -- hurricanes, blizzards, urban and rural communities affected. and our own lower shore, some somerset county was hit. that has one of the highest unemployment rates in the city -- in the state, close to 10%. 18% of the residents moved below a line of 35 $$35,000 a year.
. and finally, my personal favorite from new york city, they do three things all the time. and now ban the sale of large sodas and sugary drinks at restaurants. to curb obesity. like that is going to help. more than 200 of these laws will now be on the books come january 1. call me crazy or what. for more on what will look like in the new year, joined by university of maryland economics professor peter morrissey. great to see you again, has been a while, glad to have you back on. we talked about this before but what happens if we go over the cliff, the recession if there is no new deal. what people don't talk about, everybody agrees there'll be some sort of a recession and there is no deal. will the market be happy with any deal or are they looking for something specific? >> any deal would make them happy because that would mean we wouldn't have a recession necessarily. longer-term the market will require the united states to get a handle on the fiscal issues and to start to have a manageable plan on the deficits. we don't get that done in 2013, our bond rating will go down and maybe we print o
seen a dramatic drop in litter 0 around the city. san jose officials say their next goal is to eliminate polystyrene foam. they plan to present the city warmest to the city council in february to phase out foam boxes for large established starting in 2014 and small restaurants in 2015. >> the specific gun club may not be evicted after all the board of supervisors are expected to vote on the matter tomorrow. the city voted to of the to the club back in july after the estimated soil cleanup costs of the site would be $10.5 million. but during the eviction process, the club reached a deal for a month- to-month lease with the city. the gun club has been at this location for nearly 80 years. >> members of nasa's curiosity team are expected to give an update of its mission to mars today at noon. --the announcement will be delivered here in san francisco at the annual fall meeting of the american geophysical union. rumors about a big discovery began after curiosity's sciences was quoted as saying that a rover instrument responsible for finding inorganic compounds had gathered da
waters eight miles northwest of the kiker green between virginia city and steamboat springs a distance miles. for the first of a long line of thing before columns they distracted a large custody then. same like and a hot wasting the mid from fishers in the earth tree steamboat this gave. they needed boiling, surging noise exactly is the steamboat to. he enjoyed facing exit his handkerchief and to demand the springs. they would in two minutes or hard oil and for depending upon his mood. sawyer luxuriated in hotmail and surveyed his cards, which were murky and the haze. the spores were damp from the sweat running down his arms. the fresh bottles of dirt simon were cold. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy. in engine company have run embattled fire for broader quad under david broderick from the city's volunteer fire come any in first fire chief. so your circuits other engine house is an toiled as the steamboat engineer, flying the mexican feature a. twain, who held strong opinions on stever's perked up when sawyer mentioned he had worked as a steam vote engineer. the journalist
but again sandy hook elementary school, 60 miles from new york city. small community. rather large elementary school of nearly 700 students, kin guard 10 to 4th grade. a shooting at this elementary school. breaking details as we come into the newsroom. jon? jon: now that u.n. ambassador susan rice officially has taken herself out of the running to become secretary of state there is new speculation who president obama's nomination will go to. right now massachusetts senator john kerry considered to be at the top of the list. let's talk about it with paul gigot, editorial page editor of "the wall street journal." ironic, because if it had been susan rice, john kerry's committee would have to confirm her in the senate. >> that's right. jon: now that problem is done away with. >> well, that's right. and it would have been a big fight. jon: not a problem i should say. the circumstance. >> it would have been a big political fight. in that sense susan rice did the president a favor by removing herself from the, from the discussions so that they won't have to have this fight and the presid
. >> it is a very large storm and there's a couple of components to this from kansas city and through des moines then bending back toward milwaukee, that's where the heaviest snow is right now. >> some of those first responders trained for a mass casualty event but certainly never expected to see one. >> you're numb. there is no emotion at that point. you don't fall apart until way later. >> did you fall apart? >> not yet. >> two chicago prisoners are still at large this morning after a daring escape. >> one of their relatives said they could be in paris by now. >> they're cunning, they're daring, and they pulled off something that nobody has pulled off in that jail for 30 years. >> >> i have a problem. >> like a rock? >> the speaker of the house is pushing for a vote on his own plan "b" today. >> if plan "b" doesn't work, they have to go to plan "c," and plan "c," as you know is just pray to end that thegod that the world does end friday. that's plan "c." that's why we're here. >> i'm charlie rose with gayle king and norah o'donnell. the house is set to vote today on spea
going. we have governments both large and small from state and city government, smaller communities like long beach and some others on long island that are just waiting to see if they will get some relief so they can move forward with their plans. we beat back most of the crippling amendments, we beat back all of the crippling amendments and most of the amendments. this is a very very fine day i think in the senate. the century old tradition of different parts of the country rallying those who are beleaguered because of a difficult natural disaster. the fact that 12 republicans voted for a bill that contained virtually no offsets except for the one amendment that passed last week, that is a full bill, a whole bill, a bill that gets new york and new jersey rapidly on the road to recovery and it fills us with hope that we can get something done and get something done quickly. when we pressed, when we explained to our colleagues what we needed at a desperation here, they listened carefully and we are really very very glad about that. let me say a few specific things, there is very ample fun
's not much the employees can do because the diversion didn't violate federal law. >>> the three cities with the lowest unemployment are all in north dakota. fargo was best with 2.8. grand forks at 3.1%. the key -- large state universities which tend to provide relatively stable jobs. >>> james bond edged out the easter bunny and other this is weekend. dwt skyfall" went back to the top of the list. "the rise of the guard yans" was right behind. and "the twilight saga, breaks dawn part 2" was third. >> sadly, i have seen all of them. >> i've seen none. >>> when we come back, the australian deejays saying sorry for the royal prank that went so terribly wrong. >>> late dram pla from the nfl. lots of teams in the playoff sunt. it's a feeling of clean like nothing else. extreme clean from aquafresh showers your whole mouth. micro-active foam seeks out bad breath germs and leaves a cool tingling that just won't quit. extreme clean from aquafresh. something this delicious could only come from nature. now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calori
you're familiar with is ubl is hiding in a cave in the tribal areas surrounded by a large contingent of loyal fighters. that narrative is pre 911 ... understanding of ubl. the second mayorive that is living in the city, living in a second with multiple points of egress and entries, access to communications so that he can keep in touch with the organization. you can't run a global network and interconnected cells from a cave. >> rose: there we see her explaining. this scene in fact is talking to before as they're preparing on this mission and she's sort of providing information. >> this is a scene where they learn the objective of their profession. >> rose: before that they did not know. >> no. >> it was secret even to them. >> rose: how soon before the mission did they announce. they knew they were going on some high value target all that kind of stuff but they didn't know it was osama bin laden but they weren't stupid either. >> i would have to go back and look. less than a month probably. >> rose: this is a scene which was led by team leader patrick played by joel edgarton get
with my tent city and that i'm a racist and i break up families and i just go after brown people many of the children focussed in large part of arizona's show me your papers low believed to be one of if strictest measures in imbrags in the country. the sheriff said he would have liked to explain he doesn't make the law, only enforces it. the school district cancelled the meeting saying due to scheduling it would not work for him to speak with children. >> the sheriff says he doesn't think scheduling is the issue. >> i don't know what their agenda is. i'm sure it may have gone up the line and someone said you're not going to have that sheriff in our school the school district can ask him to respond to the children in a letter that they can read. he said the rejection didn't surprise him. he has been turned down after e agreeing to speak in his own county and elsewhere. >> the city of richmond is looking into allegations that wung of the top officials misused resources. leslie knight is accused of using public employees and facilities to use a side business of selling party favors a
economy is putting more large trucks on the road or maybe because of all the bike lanes in new york city and people are angry and trying to hit them. can't confirm that. >>> triple a reports the average annual price of gas this year will almost certainly top last year's record. well, despite that, prices are falling now and in a big way. the lund berg survey shows the average cost of a gallon of regular unleaded is down 10 cents over the past three weeks and i continuing down. what's causing this, rich? >> reporter: americans are driving less. that and slowing economic growth mean the world is using less oil. after problems earlier this year, refineries are pumping out more gas. also, warmer than average temperatures meaning americans are using less oil to heat their homes. all that pushes prices down further. prices also spiked after hurricane sandy and have fallen since, shepard. >> shepard: so right now they're headed down more, right? > >> reporter: that's right. there's a difference between lowest and highest of 80 cents a gallon. 3.85 in long island, in mems me, tennessee, it's les
to you on the highway. >>> one of the bay area's largest countes is sending large shopping bags to pasture as the new year begins on tuesday and applies to alameda counties and all of the cities. they will note longer be able to give customers one-time use plastic bags. instead, pay a dime for each recyclable paper bag used and similar laws are already in affect in san jose, san francisco and dozens of other california cities and counties. and since its ban took affect, the number of plastic bags littering city streets went down 59%. >> who counsels that stuff? >> i don't know. >>> 58%. 50million experience. >>> some local transis a -- transit agencies are offering free rides for those people wanting free rides tomorrow night. >> and? san francisco, fireworks will go off along the embarcadero. and they have free rides at 11:00 p.m. with later service only for southbound trains and muni will offer free rides with some lines running later than usual and for partiers in sill cop valley, all vta light bus and light rail is free between 7:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. and there will be exte
a large community circle around a anna kournikova. loveville noontime event is to urge people to find ways to prevent similar incidents in the future. people in new york city who want tighter gun laws are making their voices heard, marching over the brooklyn bridge last night carrying candles. they stopped in the middle of the abridged read the names of the children and adults killed at sandy hook elementary school. >> the debate over guns in america took center stage on the sunday morning talk shows. the national rifle association is not backing down from a controversial idea of putting armed guards in schools. >> i don't understand why you cannot just four minutes imagine that when that horrible monster tried to shoot his way into sandy hook school and that if a good guy with a gun had been there, he might of been able to stop largest gun rights lobby also says the white house gun violence task force led by vice president joe biden may try to undermine the second amendment. 5:0732 degrees. >> still ahead in reston, showing off another amazing holiday display. how it is helping a great ca
it way to them, it will make it to large agents and barr creas bureaucrar filter down. >> we have a potpourri of task forces and agents out there assessing the damage, and trying to tell the state and city. neil: what do they do run around with clip boards? >> they do, they have clip boards, and they bac back flappg with politicians,. neil: what do you do with the femafficials? >> we don't see the officials, we see the rep they are holed up in a trailer making decisions on what next person they will appoint to what next task force. but people are not getting any help. and what i can tell you, that there one guy who i think has a good solution, new york state senator, andrew lande, he reached out the me today, said, john, i need you and i need you to find me guys like you on the ground i can bring civilians into this task force, give us ideas where we need help, and what we can do with this money when he get it. how -- >> we're channeling it through washington, and the agents and regional heads then to staten island, then jersey shore pennies on the dollar by that point. >> the smi
for several minutes. now, a coastal city did report a three-foot high tsunami. but no large waves. there have been several aftershocks. a couple of 5.0 tremors as well. >>> a man suffered serious injuries after surning around 30 feet after the oakland raider game. christien kafton is live at the coliseum and has been getting reaction from fans and has new information. >> reporter: we have new information, whether this individual fell or jumped. right now, oakland police are treating this as an accidental fall. let's show you the seen. we do know that that fan fell from -- we do know the fan fell from the third level of that concourse down to the lower level here. we've also learned the fall was on the outside of the stadium. so you are looking at the exact areaor the exact type of fall that individual would have taken. that's somewhere between 30 to 50 feet. oakland police told me that they estimated -- estimated that fall between 0 feet. he fell during the -- during the raiders and broncos' game. there were some conflicting reports over this, whether this individual jumped or fell. that inci
to be this political machine. but by and large it was run during these two guys in a connecticut yankee. it is the history of the city and the sub title, fearless as next and political wizard, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. but it's a different time now. i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is about five or six townsel put together. it's story, schenectady, colony in saratoga. saratoga is only half an hour away. these are great places to live and to see. there's a lot to see you next time. it's also the beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have the reputation anymore i had. >> according to author mike lofgren, "the party is over." how the republicans are crazy, democrats became useless and the middle class that shafted. mr. lofgren, how did the republicans go crazy? >> well, they go crazy when they became an apocalyptic home that lives in its own bubble. we have seen not in the last election. they simply could not believe the public polls, what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and most d
if his center is closed under state law neighborhood grocery stores large and small will have to pick up the slack or face fines. this resident says it would be a mistake for the city to close the center. >> it's very convenient for the neighborhood. i like the idea of being able to recycle. >>reporter: but after years of legal wrangling it appears time is up. eviction notice is now in effect. hank supporters rallied at city hall today hoping for a miracle. but according to the sheriff's department the departure is imminent. >> we are confident that at least hopeful that they are going to vacate the premises voluntarily. >>reporter: if not he says there will be a forced eviction by the end of the first week in january. in san francisco, at city hall, carolyn tyler, abc 7 news. >>> all right. it's that time of year. just ahead. nominee are out for the first major film arrest ward of the season. list our don sanchez played a role in compiling. >> plus. my god my god. caught on video. scary moments for one family as they watch for one family as they watch the +1 >>. >> nominee
. good to see you. we are here with the waterford crystal ball. very large. 12 feet in diameter. had no idea it was this large until i was right here on top of the building. it is a chilly start to the day here in new york city. looking at temperatures in the 30s. it feels much colder when you factor in the breeze. oned chills should be in the 20s. you have found el up. i have seen people rive about noon. 12-hours waiting out here until midnight. it will be much worse across places like the midwest with temperatures only in the single digits today. it will feel colder as well. in florida a nice day temperatures in the 70s. very typical. we have a new storm that we are going to be tracking. we are seeing areas of rain across portions of texas and tennessee on the northern side of the storm system you will be seeing areas of snow. keep that in mind tonight. >>> thank you. >>> now your starting lineup the top sports stories rg 3 is playoff wound. the rookie quarterback leading the redskins to the nfc east title in 1999. won in a winner take all game for the division. washington on a 7 g
: that's the city's main attraction for handley and other visitors this year, according to a new report. numbers show these underwater creatures show large crowds, draw 1.4 million visitors to the state. and helps maintain 333 jobs. >> it helps us to understand the impact we're making to the community. >> reporter: this comes as they received a nonprofit grant from the state. >> the $2.5 million that the state made available to us to help support that project was very, very important. to us, remaining vital and relevant, really providing new things for our visitors. >> reporter: the report also shows that people who come to the national aquarium annually, more than half of them are from out of state. >> what does that mean for in immediaters? how do they benefit? >> because people are coming from out of town, money that they spend else where, they're spending here. everyone from maryland benefit from that. >> reporter: translation, they spend on food, lodging, transportation. money funneled back into our own city, our very own backyard. >> r
in the city of budapest. the attack on hon. jews happen later in the war. effectively, -- the attack on hungarian jews happen later in the war. a large community survive in budapest, a couple hundred thousand, which is a significant number. in poland they survive in all kinds of ways. many survive are going to the soviet union. many came home to find what was left. one very sad and moving archival document said many come home just to see the cemeteries and then leave because they do not want to be there anymore. jews to come back. some try to make new lives there. some joined the communist party. the communist party has an attraction not just for jews, but for anybody who experience the devastation of the war and the shattering of morality the war brought. many people did see in communism a kind of alternatives. maybe this system will work. liberal democracy did not work. the west did not come to our aid. maybe there is some alternative. there was a brief time when people were listening to the radio station, and it was attractive for jews who had nothing else that were excluded from
24 last year. the city has seen a decrease in the number of other violent crimes, like attempted murder and assault. a detective says the drop is largely due to richmond's increased police force. the department has again from 40 officers to 190 in recent years. >>> 5:57. next, can lawmakers broker an 11th hour deal to keep the country from falling off the fiscal cliff? important meetings set to begin in hours. >>> vodka bottle credited with thwarting this stick-up tempt. we'll show you the dramatic video. >>> and michael finney gives your new year's resolution to drop weight a jumpstart. we'll put >>> last day of 2012, good morning i'm katie marzullo in for eric thomas. >>> and i'm kristen sze. clear, beautiful weather. >>> check it out right here, boom, that is clear, no radar returns no rain, the only thing you are going to find is a little frost on the ground this morning because of the chilly temperatures. a few high clouds from time to time, definitely a bright day. off to a chilly start around the bay 34 to 44, 44 in san francisco, the warm spot. by noon, [ inaudible ]
corporate tax deductions to the large corporations, and not willing to help those who are small. neil: senator, i may be over analyzing this stuff. i was in your fine city yesterday, and everyone sort of read things differently, but when i heard the administration float a trial balloon of we'll look at lowering corporate tax rates or corporate tax reform, was that their way of trying to entice the hatches and others of your still skeptical minds to come support an agreement that would include all of the above in >> i don't think so. you know, i care less what the wealthy have, but there's a human number of small businesses hit by this. their marginal tax rate up 24%. 53% of the businesses will be hit very, very hard. most of them put moneys back into the business so they can hire people. they don't particularly take their moneys out, but, you know, if they are going to have to pay marginal tax rates 24% higher, they will not hire people. that's the problem. 70% of all jobs come through the small business sector, and it's as though the people in the white house have no knowledge about
: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, traveled to norfolk recently to look at how it has been struggling with flooding and preparing for the next big storm. he worked with member station whro to bring us this report. it's part of our series-- working with public media partners across the country-- that we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when r
. they were all part of this mosaic that came to be, this political machine. but by and large, it was run by these two guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the the city that's in the subtitle; fearless ethnics, political wizards, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. and, but it's a different town now. it's, i mean, it's no long orer just albany. albany, it's about five or six towns all put together. it's troy, it's schenectady, it's colony, it's saratoga. saratoga's only half an hour away. and these are great places to live and to see, and there's a lot to see in this town. town is coming back. it's also a great, a beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford white thought it had. >>
of this country's labor movement. in 1960, flint was michigan's second largest city 200,000 people. it also had a vibrant middle class, it's public school system was a model for the nation and that was due in large part to the strength of its labor unions and the large number of manufacturing workers living in flint. they took over a factory and they didn't leave until they reached a deal with management. workers occupied several general motor's plants. not for a day, a week but for month -- actually for longer than a month for 40-consecutive days and it worked. they got bargaining rights, and 40-hour workweek and a minimum wage. they had 100,000 people turned out in detroit to show their support for the striking workers in flint 100,000 people. and yesterday, 12,000 people turned out in lancing, michigan to protest against the state's new right to work law. it's a devastating blow to the heart of organized labor in this country, and perhaps no one knows more about than that that garl dean blankinship. >> my father called home one night, he was working on the second shift.
began. and a large community. a significant figure at that time given the population of the city. in poland this survive in all kinds of ways. many people survived by going to the soviet union command many people come home to find what is left to see what kind of live they made. one very bad and moving document can last many come home just to see the cemeteries and leave because they don't wanta be there anymore. but they come back. some try and make new lives there. some join the communist parties. the communist party as an attraction for -- a buddy who has experienced the devastation of the war, the shattering of all ethics and all morales lehigh, many people did see in communism a kind of alternative. there was a time, a very brief time when some people so they come back. and some really camino, it's a strange and cards started tell because sums on the communist party and some immediately come into conflict with the communist party because a lot of them are small traders are merchants.the. they then begin to be large groups. help train qc will fight for independence and palest
on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and passionate about his work right to the end. it was also very instructive to recognize it is not work if you love what you do. >> let me follow-up on that. you have spoken about how you have never taken the easy path. you are drawn to where the heat is. that takes a tremendous amount of courage. why are you drawn to that? >> i do not know the answer completely except that i grew up as the oldest daughter and oldest granddaugh
the army and were recently able to overtake the city of goma despite a large u.n. security presence there. the house armed services committee hosts this hearing. this is three hours. i can't help but reflect on the millions of innocent people around the world who are caught in fundamentally unjust and socially complex situations. these situations can make anyone's heart break and naturally leads one to consider the simple question what can be done. one thing it sure makes me appreciate our country. i have heard that less than 2% of the people that have ever lived here on the earth have lived under the kind of freedoms that we enjoy. we are so blessed. and when we see how innocent lives are -- how people are hurt so much by some of the thing that is are happening around the world, it just again really makes me appreciate home. the question and likewise the answer becomes more complex as we contemplate what can be done within the context of u.s. national security interest constrained budgets ongoing commitments around the globe and potential future contingencies that the military has to be
on the south side of the city of chicago. and i am a pastor of my church. i am here to support hr 308. the large capacity ammunition device act which i have been a co-sponsor of since march of last year. hearing reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports
area where you will find a lot of gun violence and if you look at some cities, some urban areas where there are large numbers of gun deaths, it's not because of mental illness. it's because of the drug trade, the drug business, of course, and crime. >> isn't there a part of it that people who are witnessing and dealing with those environments and who are living through these shootings, then there is an issue with mental illness. a kid growing up in that environment -- >> it's traumatic. it's traumatic. it's a tough thing for any kid. there was a time at our church where on new year's eve, when we had our new year's eve celebration, as soon as the clock turned 12:00, we knew it was 12:00 because we could hear the gunfire outside our church. that hasn't happened in recent years. but that's a frightening thing to know that on new year's eve, you might get hit by a stray bullet. >> and it happens. it happens. but i also think, you know, in thinking about our administrative assistant we had whose son was shot and killed on easter sunday. he came out on the porch to talk to another kid, sho
francisco city workers. park crew decided this tree along the great highway was just about to fall. so they decided to bring the spruce down before it did any damage. >> large storm we have pounded the coast from ocean beach to pacifica. jeff who lives in a home by the shore says living here means you have to be ready when the types of storms come through. >> always be prepared. battery on hand. should be no surprise to anybody especially in the bay area. >>reporter: great highway remains closed due to the storms. at 1:00 p.m. the sky above the city was bright by a passing rainbow. this is 7 news. >>> hundreds of homes and businesses on the peninsula still in the dark because of power outages there. we even found a water log football field. more on that from vick lee. >>reporter: this correct in san jose was roaring. fast and furious this morning vrlt. but the santa clara valley water district said there were no problems today. all of the creek that had the potential to flood were weigh below the overflow levels. but san mateo county workers at menlo high school were busy
? >> they don't occur all in the same city. they don't occur in the same neighborhoods. they're so rare, they don't occur clustered anywhere, fortunately. there it seems to me restricting access to highpowered weapons and large capacity magazines is a necessary step. as you point out, it's not going to lead to an immediate elimination or even, it seems to me, important reduction in the number of incidents. but overtime i'm reasonably certain it would lead to a reduction in the number of victims. we call these mass killings because of the number of victims involved. and if there's less access to the kinds of weapons that show up disproportionately to these killings over time, there should be fewer victims. >> we could have a tirter assault weapons ban going-forward as well. richard rosenfeld thank you very much for your time tonight. and your work on this issue. >> thank you, ezra. >>> you probably remember jack klugman, he was oscar madison on "the odd couple" and quincy. he was also the most heroic actor to play an american medical examiner in history. and that story is coming up. >>>
they lived in a part of america, particularly a rural area, or an older industrialized city, where the economy has just not come back as rapidly as it has in some better off parts of the country. this is a circumstance that people are in largely because of their region, not because of laziness, certainly. and also, not because of race or age or all the other factors. those factors are always there, and they're always important. but there are some really targeted regional sufferings that are taking place. >> let's be honest here. you mentioned race, gender, we can talk about class. those are the factors that have not motivated many americans to be as empathetic as they might otherwise be. but you would think that the notion that somebody they knew, some uncles, some cousins, some person in your family who's out of work through no fault or his or her own would at least garner the empathy of these folks in congress. why hasn't it worked? >> i think they've written these folks off. and you've written about this, and you know well, that the politics of america is defined increasingly no
, keep the creeks clear of garbage and when they do see garbage piling up to give city officials a call and this situation they say was just too late. amy hollyfield, abc7 news. >>> road crews will be out today trying to make sure they are repairing a large pothole on highway 4 in pittsburg and that repair work is holding. the gave flat tires to drivers yesterday morning. at one point there was a line of cars with flats from that pothole. one driver told us, 25 cars were waiting to get fix. >>> people in live in a vallejo mobile home park are back home this morning. under water as a creek overflowed. there were whitewater rapids through the middle of that park forcing residents to move to higher ground. this morning the water receded things are still muddy. no injuries. the storm watch continues here, stay with you can track the rainy time with live doppler 7 hd at abc7news.com. >>> bart says its computer system should be up and running normally this morning following a power outage that shutdown the system twice, knocking out bart's main system yesterday some were stranded an hour befo
a large photo. but to run up and down the state to ocean city we had a four-lane bridge and we just replaced it. the old bridge is gone. it is amazing. five months ago we were using that bridge. as a major link. we experience widespread storm damage. we continue to work with officials to see the extent of our losses. preliminary assessments from connecticut and new jersey jersey, this will sound modest but we need between 7.5 and $9 million. for preparation, response and prepares. fish and wildlife service and army corps still has their own assessments but they tell us it will be tens of millions of dollars for repairs. this seems like a small number but with the state budget they will need assistance through fema. if an ounce of prevention is worth it is we must mitigate the effect of future storms. this is the recurring theme especially is climate change increases the severity of the coastal storm. the army corpshas built extra projects and in delaware and down the east coast in no small part to the separates they performed exceptionally well with billions of dollars of damages ri
, that is likely to conclude that the state department was largely at fault for failures, security failures prior to benghazi. so to blame susan rice who's over at the u.n. mostly in new york city for benghazi is really a stretch. she was the werngs who went out on sunday television. and she said today to brian williams that she is not blameless. i think there was a lack of care with the talking points and the republicans seized on it and claims she was being political and trying to be political at a key point in the presidential election campaign, which she strongly denies. >> but you're saying that the president's statements to that effect were not enough because they were not backed up with essentially procedural support for her to be fighting these attacks that could have happened had he nominated her. >> once she's nominated she is armed with the white house counsel's office-w every wise person, man or woman in washington who would be assigned to her to get her through the nomination process. but she was left -- she said she didn't feel that she's a victim here, but she certainly did acknowl
known, particularly in the city of budapest. the attack on hon. jews happen later in the war. effectively, -- the attack on hungarian jews happen later in the war. a large community survive in budapest, a couple hundred , which is a significant number. in poland they survive in all kinds of ways. many survive are going to the soviet union. many came home to find what was left. one very sad and moving archival document said many come home just to see the cemeteries and then leave because they do not want to be there anymore. jews to come back. some try to make new lives there. some joined the communist party. the communist party has an attraction not just for jews, but for anybody who experience the devastation of the war and the shattering of morality the war brought. many people did see in communism a kind of alternatives. maybe this system will work. liberal democracy did not work. the west did not come to our aid. maybe there is some alternative. there was a brief time when people were listening to the radio station, and it was attractive for jews who had nothing else that
. she is still at large. deadly subway pushing in less than a month in new york city. there is no deal yet for the fiscal cliff. but for now we have at least avoided the container cliff. 15,000 dock workers at 15 major u.s. ports and port owners agreeing to extend an expired contract for 30 days. the main issue is container royalties. the heavier the container the more dock workers get paid. owners want to cap payments. a strike would have meant higher prices on many goods like clothing, auto goods and electronic products because they would have been in short supply. emma lou harris could be in trouble with the law. tmz reports that harris is accused of hitting another car on a highway then driving off. the l.a. county d.a. is deciding whether harris will face any charges. in one was hurt. a rep for the singer says it was so minor harris didn't even know she hit the other car. and those are your headlines. >> thank you, juliet. let's talk about this story because this is outrageous. >> dave: unbelievable. >> juliet: sick. >> clayton: here is what vladimir putin did in response to the u
-presidential protesters in tahrir square. in other parts of the city, about two miles from here, as many as 200,000 protesters turned out. these are people who support president morsi. many of them from the muslim brotherhood. a large number were bussed in from rural areas in egypt. many carrying the koran and shouting, god is the law. it was a real show of force and show of public support by those who support egypt's new president. he also announced there will be a constitutional referendum on december 15. it came really after a vote on friday pushing through that constitution in one day. now the nation will have the chance to vote up or down on that constitution. president morsi said the extreme powers he declared for himself last week would end when that constitution is ratified. perhaps in just two weeks' time. it's not clear that's going to be enough for the protesters behind me, some of whom intend to sleep on the square until they drive president morsi from power. rick, back to you. >> rick: steve streaming live from cairo. thanks. >> arthel: closer to home, our neighbor to the south swe
' promotional film foretold everything from nuclear power plants that would light up cities to new and improved means of transportation. >> while nuclear power in locomotives, submarines, ships and even very large airplanes may all but revolutionize future transportation on land, sea and air. >> osgood: on december 2, 1957, 15 years to the day after that chain reaction in chicago, americans first commercial nuclear power plant opened in shippingport pennen. >> this plant has a secure place in american history. it is the first of the world's large-scale nuclear power stations exclusively devoted to peaceful purposes. >> osgood: today with just over 100 plants across the united states producing roughly 20% of our electricity, the nuclear industry's future stands at a cross roads. >> evacuation. please stay indoors with your windows closed. >> reporter: opponents of new plant construction point to the leak at pennsylvania's three mile island in 1979, to the soviet reactor meltdown in chernobyl in 1986 and to the fukushima disaster in japan after last year's earthquake and tsunami. supporters count
. but, by and large, it was run by these two guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it's, it's the history of the city that's in the subtitle, fearless ethnics, political wizards, underrated scoundrels. and we still have a lot of those. but it's a different town now. it's, i mean, it's no longer just albany. it's about five or six towns all put together. it's troy, it's schenectady, it's colony, it's saratoga. saratoga's only half an hour away. and these are great places to live and to see, and can there's a lot to see in this town. town is coming back. it's also a great, a beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town, and a lot of people know it know. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that fanford white thought it had. >> albany, new york, is one of the oldest surviving settlements from the original and colonies and the longest continuously-chartered city in the united states. next, we hear from jack casey. his book tells the story of katiri, a mohawk woman born in 1656 who was recently named the first native american to enter sainthood. >> well, lily of the mohawks is
't right you know? in other words, we've earned the right by and large g.e.'s relationship in china is good. we've been a good investor for a long time. we've taken a lot of heat here in new york city and washington, d.c. because we've stood tall as good, honest partner with the chinese. but what's also incumbent on you is when you've earned that position occasionally you have to speak up. and i did. >> rose: as you know, when you speak up about china people also say "look at general electric, this great american company. they're exporting jobs as well." >> we have jobs all over the world, right? so we are the second-biggest exporter behind boeing. we're a net exporter in every other country in the world. but we will sell more gas turbines -- we have a 50% market share of the large gas turbine market. we will sell more in algeria in the next three years than the united states. so what are we supposed to do? are we supposed to sit here and just say, oh, it's too hard? >> rose: and if you don't get the business somebody else will. >> somebody else is going to get it. we're down to the point a
to the cities that leads to this kind of carnage and i think we as a country have to have an assault weapons ban and stop selling these large -- >> bill: i got to go. let me ask you one question. >> be honest about the fact that's what you want to do. in australia, they took guns away from people -- >> bill: hold it! hold it! >> you overreact. >> bill: hold it. i think there should be a uniform thing of all 50 states about who you sell to and information about guns. but juan, the thing about the semiautomatic ban, 300 million guns here. as mr. gottlieb pointed out, they're going to buy them and they're around and the bad guys are going to have them and the good guys aren't. >> you just can't curse the night. you got to do something, bill. >> not if it doesn't work and if you're impeding other people. >> bill: right. you don't make it worse. very interesting debate, you guys. directly ahead, we'll take to you connecticut where bill hemmer is report ago community in agony. he's been there all weekend. we will update you on that american marine being held in a mexican prison. those reports afte
to the bill saying they don't want to approve such large amounts of spending so qukly. around $47 billion of the aid would go to rebuilding damaged areas and helping aid the recovery efforts. the rest would help protect cities against future storms. >>> day eight of our 12 days of giving here on "news4 midday." during these 12 days we're profiling non-profits working to change lives in our area. we invite you to help these great causes. >> keith, it's called boromeo housing. it is a lifeline literally for homeless mothers in washington county around around the washington area. they provide education and housing and critical life skills. you can help this group by calling 202-885-4949. joining me now is darlene bacci and andrea reyes and her little girl. tell us more about this. i understand you're celebrating 25 years. >> yes. this is our 25th anniversary. our mission has not changed in 25 years. we are still an education first, transitional housing program for young single mothers age 16 to 22 and their child. to participate in our program they must be enrolled in school full time, eithe
although the city is 267 southwest from the epicenter. you can see high-rise buildings swaying there. the quake rattled many nerves of course. one quake reported a three foot high tsunami but no large waves. the tsunami warning has been lifted. rail service was temporarily stopped for safety checks. >>> time now 6:02. a lot of questions right now after a man fell 30 feet during last nights raiders game. ktvu christien kafton is live outside the coliseum. what are police saying? >> reporter: there are a lot of discrepancies in this story. take a look here we're now at the raider store just across from the coliseum. a lot of questions about this fan who survived. either jumping or accidentally falling from the third deck to the lower concourse below. estimated 30-50 feet. that fan fell during last nights raiders-broncos game. emt, police, and sheriffs deputies were on scene. they were able to respond quickly. there are conflicting reports whether that fan fell or jumped. they say it's a very long drop from that third level down to the lower concourse and recall incidents like this have
for the design of washington city. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly all inspiring. in 1821 a european diplomat told congress that it was neither large nor khatami inspiring -- often inspiring -- awe inspiring. perhaps some president would be inclined to become the permanent resident if it were. >> niki goldberg has gathered some of her favorite white house photos. watch on sunday evening. eastern and space -- eastern and pacific. >> my inspiration was the idea that i wanted to explain how it happened. we do know the story of the cold war. we know the documents, we have seen the archives that describe the relationships between roosevelt, stalin, churchill, and truman. we know the main events from our point of view. what i wanted to do was show it from a different angle, from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people subjected to this system. how did people make choices in that system? how did they react? one of the things that happened since 1989 is that the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer hav
. >> eliot: as well we should. editor at large of the atlantic, steve clemons president of ploughshares fund, joe cirincione. seemingly they're right back where they started. what speakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakak nobody knows disasters like comedians. >> new york, the high-tech resilient city. just don't get us wet. what the hell was that? >> that's from my upcoming benefit for victims of hurricane sandy. i booked the strongest, smartest comics i could find. my comedian friends and i will raise money to rebuild homes and lives one laugh at a time. >> awe damn, the lights are out! you know what? i'll watch a little television until they come back on. >> only on current tv. >> eliot: on the 18 -- only 18 days remain until we go over the so-called fiscal cliff and with congress once again heading home after another grueling two-day work week, president obama met once again with speaker boehner. while the president keeps talking about revenues, speaker boehner focuses on expenditures and it is hard to tell if any progress is being made.
in the streets of our cities. it doesn't belong where it can be picked up easily by a grievance killer who can walk into a workplace, a mall, a theate and now an elementary school and kill large numbers. >> ifill: explain to our viewers what you are planning to introduce have changed what happened in newtown connecticut >> well, over time that weapon would be much less available. what we're trying to do is ban the sale, the manufacture, the transfer, the importation of assault weapons. it gets quite technical. i won't go into that right now. granather weapons that people already have. subject those weapons either to licensing or to a trigger lock. and spell out those grandfathered weapons which would be over 900 in the bill so nobody can say, oh, we took our... their hunting weapon away. then i'd be able to say here's your hunting weapon. it's specifically exempted in the bill. >> ifill: we're talking about prospective law, not one... >> that's right, that's right. it would ban approximately 100 weapons by actual name. and then weapons by physical characteristics. >> ifill: let's talk about th
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